Thank you Balwyn High School!

Today was amazing! Young people from the other side of the planet came to our school and gave an incredible performance. We had invited children from our neighbouring local schools to come along and share in this special performance and they came. Our visitors were students from Balwyn High School and they worked their socks off to give us a performance we will not forget in a hurry.

Their choir was terrific. They sang a range of songs – from “The rum tum tum of a military drum” to the “Spirit of adventure” from the Disney film, Up. However the song that really struck a chord with our audience was “I am Australian”. Lots of staff reported being moved to tears by this song.

The children went wild at the Jazz combo section and everyone clicked, clapped and swayed along.

What really brought the house down though was a South African song that the choir performed but with help from our children. The children were thrilled to be invited to join in. Our visitors really encouraged and cajoled a great performance from our children.

Here are some picturesIMG 3577 Thank you Balwyn High School!

IMG 3579 Thank you Balwyn High School!

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IMG 3583 Thank you Balwyn High School!

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IMG 3588 Thank you Balwyn High School!

IMG 3591 Thank you Balwyn High School!

IMG 3592 Thank you Balwyn High School!

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IMG 3597 Thank you Balwyn High School!

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IMG 3574 Thank you Balwyn High School!

After the concert our very own St Teresa’s choir leapt up to give an impromptu completely unrehearsed performance led by the very able Mrs Aransiola. The Australian students were itching to join in and so before we knew it a totally unplanned jam was underway!

It turns out that music really is a universal language and it is one that both Balwyn and St Teresa’s are fully fluent in!

We are so grateful to the teachers and students of Balwyn High for making our last day so special and one which we will never forget. We are planning to stay in touch and we look forward to hearing how the rest of their European tour goes!

This blog doesn’t begin to do justice to the incredible day that we had. I think you really had to be there to appreciate. On a personal note I just want to share how truly wonderful it was watching young people from different schools and cultures uniting through the power of music.

Below is a video clip of the students from Balwyn performing at their school. It will give you an idea of the hgh standard of their music

Music during World War II

I am so sorry Year 6 that I missed you World War 2 Day. I can’t wait to the pictures and hear about how it went. Meanwhile here is some music from the era.

Music was very important to people during the second world war. Factories played popular tunes to keep their workers happy and to get them to work harder. Homesick soldiers enjoyed the special music concerts that the Army arranged for them. Lots of people sang cheery tunes to help them keep their spirits up.

The video below is taken from a radio programme that used to be played every day in factories. It is quite different from the radio programmes that the BBC make today!

trans Music during World War II

Glenn Miller was an American musician and composer who was very famous before the war. Once war broke out he joined the army and used music to keep up morale for the American soldiers.

trans Music during World War II

This is a very famous song by a singer called Vera Lynn. Soldiers were going off to fight leaving their families behind. Many wives and mothers were terrified their sons and husbands would be killed and not return so the song “We’ll meet again” tried to reassure families that there loved ones would actually return

trans Music during World War II

Dances were very popular. Below is an American style of dancing that was very energetic!

trans Music during World War II

The BBC have collected together everyday sounds from life in Britain during World War 2 here

Below is a clip from Billy Cotton who was a very popular British dance band leader.

Mia is learning the viola

Today Mia came to see me bringing her viola and her music. I have recorded her playing “Patricks Reel”. Mia is very busy preparing for her viola exam. She practises every single day for 8 minutes!

Have a listen and leave us a comment below.

IMG 8697 Mia is learning the viola

I am really impressed with how much Mia has developed since the beginning of the year.

Computational thinking to analyse song structure

Thanks to Ms Schofield to alerting me to this

I think it is a really cool way to analyse the structure of song lyrics. Ms Schofield reckons it is a good way to practise computational thinking. So year 6 – can you create a lyrical flow chart for a song of your choice?

Here are some lyrics to get you started:

Because I’m happy
Clap along if you feel like a room without a roof
Because I’m happy
Clap along if you feel like happiness is the truth
Because I’m happy
Clap along if you know what happiness is to you
Because I’m happy
Clap along if you feel like that’s what you wanna do
Or try this

Mamma mia, here I go again My my, how can I resist you Mamma mia, does it show again My my, just how much I’ve missed you

Yes, I’ve been brokenhearted Blue since the day we parted Why, why did I ever let you go Mamma mia, now I really know My my, I could never let you go

Analysing lyrics in this way should really help us when we come to write our own songs next term!